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Newton Prize 2019 winners

Read about the winning Newton Prize 2019 partnerships between the UK and China, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Find out more about the full shortlist in the Newton Prize 2019 booklet (PDF, 3 Mb).

 

UK-CHINA: Designing sustainable services for the new urban population
UK-CHINA: Designing sustainable services for the new urban population

Countries around the world are struggling to meet the challenge of rapid urban expansion and ageing populations. The UK-China partnership applied big data and service design principles to urban development. The work helped to improve transportation services, and led to better access and suitability of services for the elderly.

UK-INDONESIA: Building resilient coastal communities
UK-INDONESIA: Building resilient coastal communities

Recent flooding and tsunamis in Indonesia highlight the devastation caused by coastal hazards, and the urgent need to build the resilience of coastal communities. UK and Indonesian researchers have developed new strategies that can protect centres of economic growth and protect homes, businesses and infrastructure in coastal urban areas.

UK-PHILIPPINES: Boosting prosperity and health by turning sewage into fertiliser
UK-PHILIPPINES: Boosting prosperity and health by turning sewage into fertiliser

In the Metropolitan Manila region in the Philippines, 75 percent of sewage directly flows into natural water bodies untreated, causing severe water pollution which adversely impacts people’s health and the local economy. Newton funded researchers in the UK and the Philippines have come up with an innovative solution to effectively convert wastewater into nutrient-rich fertiliser.

CHAIR'S PRIZE: A new way to monitor crops for global food security
CHAIR'S PRIZE: A new way to monitor crops for global food security

Urban development, shrinking space for arable land, and groundwater depletion all threaten future food production. Accurate monitoring of agricultural productivity is essential for both global food security and the livelihoods of low-income rural regions. UK-China researchers have used advanced data assimilation techniques to vastly improve accuracy of crop monitoring and crop yield estimates.